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Effective C++

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Effective C++

Effective C++

50 specific ways to improve your programs and designs

- Collection Professional computing

304 pages, parution le 09/10/1997

Résumé

The first edition of Effective C++ sold nearly 100,000 copies and was translated into four languages. It's easy to understand why. Scott Meyers' practical approach to C++ described the rules of thumb employed by the experts--the things they almost always do or almost always avoid doing--to produce clear, correct, efficient code.

Each of this book's 50 guidelines summarizes a way to write better C++, and the accompanying discussions are backed by specific examples. For this new edition, Meyers reworked every guideline in the book. The result is exceptional adherence to C++'s Draft International Standard, current compiler technology, and the latest insights into the use of C++ for real-world applications.

Highlights of Effective C++, 2nd Edition include:

  • Expert guidance on object-oriented design, class design, and the proper use of inheritance
  • An examination of the standard C++ library, including how the Standard Template Library and classes like string and vector affect the structure of well-written programs
  • Discussions of late-breaking language features like in-class constant initializations, namespaces, and member templates
  • Wisdom usually possessed by only the most experienced developers

Effective C++ continues to be essential reading for every developer working with C++.

Table of contents :

  • Preface ..... xiii
  • Acknowledgments ..... xvii
  • Introduction ..... 1
  • Shifting from C to C++ ..... 13
    • Item 1: Prefer const and inline to #define. ..... 13
    • Item 2: Prefer <iostream> to <stdio.h>. ..... 17
    • Item 3: Prefer new and delete to malloc and free. ..... 19
    • Item 4: Prefer C++-style comments. ..... 21
  • Memory Management ..... 22
    • Item 5: Use the same form in corresponding uses of new and delete. ..... 23
    • Item 6: Use delete on pointer members in destructors. ..... 24
    • Item 7: Be prepared for out-of-memory conditions. ..... 25
    • Item 8: Adhere to convention when writing operator new and operator delete. ..... 33
    • Item 9: Avoid hiding the "normal" form of new. ..... 37
    • Item 10: Write operator delete if you write operator new. ..... 39
  • Constructors, Destructors, and Assignment Operators ..... 49
    • Item 11: Declare a copy constructor and an assignment operator for classes with dynamically allocated memory. ..... 49
    • Item 12: Prefer initialization to assignment in constructors. ..... 52
    • Item 13: List members in an initialization list in the order in which they are declared. ..... 57
    • Item 14: Make destructors virtual in base classes. ..... 59
    • Item 15: Have operator= return a reference to *this. ..... 64
    • Item 16: Assign to all data members in operator=. ..... 68
    • Item 17: Check for assignment to self in operator=. ..... 71
  • Classes and Functions: Design and Declaration ..... 77
    • Item 18: Strive for class interfaces that are complete and minimal. ..... 79
    • Item 19: Differentiate among member functions, non-member functions, and friend functions. ..... 84
    • Item 20: Avoid data members in the public interface. ..... 89
    • Item 21: Use const whenever possible. ..... 91
    • Item 22: Prefer pass-by-reference to pass-by-value. ..... 98
    • Item 23: Don't try to return a reference when you must return an object. ..... 101
    • Item 24: Choose carefully between function overloading and parameter defaulting. ..... 106
    • Item 25: Avoid overloading on a pointer and a numerical type. ..... 109
    • Item 26: Guard against potential ambiguity. ..... 113
    • Item 27: Explicitly disallow use of implicitly generated member functions you don't want. ..... 116
    • Item 28: Partition the global namespace. ..... 117
  • Classes and Functions: Implementation ..... 123
    • Item 29: Avoid returning "handles" to internal data. ..... 123
    • Item 30: Avoid member functions that return non-const pointers or references to members less accessible than themselves. ..... 129
    • Item 31: Never return a reference to a local object or to a dereferenced pointer initialized by new within the function. ..... 131
    • Item 32: Postpone variable definitions as long as possible. ..... 135
    • Item 33: Use inlining judiciously. ..... 137
    • Item 34: Minimize compilation dependencies between files. ..... 143
  • Inheritance and Object-Oriented Design ..... 153
    • Item 35: Make sure public inheritance models "isa." ..... 154
    • Item 36: Differentiate between inheritance of interface and inheritance of implementation. ..... 161
    • Item 37: Never redefine an inherited nonvirtual function. ..... 169
    • Item 38: Never redefine an inherited default parameter value. ..... 171
    • Item 39: Avoid casts down the inheritance hierarchy. ..... 173
    • Item 40: Model "has-a" or "is-implemented-in-terms-of" through layering. ..... 182
    • Item 41: Differentiate between inheritance and templates. ..... 185
    • Item 42: Use private inheritance judiciously. ..... 189
    • Item 43: Use multiple inheritance judiciously. ..... 194
    • Item 44: Say what you mean; understand what you're saying. ..... 210
  • Miscellany ..... 212
    • Item 45: Know what functions C++ silently writes and calls. ..... 212
    • Item 46: Prefer compile-time and link-time errors to runtime errors. ..... 216
    • Item 47: Ensure that non-local static objects are initialized before they're used. ..... 219
    • Item 48: Pay attention to compiler warnings. ..... 223
    • Item 49: Familiarize yourself with the standard library. ..... 224
    • Item 50: Improve your understanding of C++. ..... 232
  • Afterword ..... 237
  • Index ..... 239

L'auteur Scott Meyers

Scott Meyers - Consultant américain, expert de niveau international reconnu dans la communauté des développeurs C++, diplômé de Stanford et de Brown University.Il est déjà l'auteur des ouvrages de référence Effective C++ (3e ed, 2005 Addison-Wesley), de More Effective C++ (1996 Addison-Wesley) et de Effective STL (2001 Addison-Wesley). Il a longtemps été conseiller éditorial pour l'informatique chez Addison-Wesley.

Autres livres de Scott Meyers

Caractéristiques techniques du livre "Effective C++"

  PAPIER
Éditeur(s) Addison Wesley
Auteur(s) Scott Meyers
Collection Professional computing
Parution 09/10/1997
Nb. de pages 304
EAN13 9780201924886
Sélection de Noël

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